Friday, September 17, 2021

Catherine DeMayo

18 POSTS

The Labyrinth

What sets The Labyrinth apart, though, is both the beauty and simplicity of Lohrey’s writing and the magnitude of the tragedy that has caused her narrator, Erica, to flee Sydney for a tiny coastal town.

 ‘I hope the book will reach kids like me’

The Boy from the Mish is both a classic coming of age novel and an unusual book.

The Boy from the Mish

The Boy from the Mish is both a classic coming of age novel and an unusual book.

My Year of Living Vulnerably

Two years after his widely acclaimed One Hundred Years of Dirt, journalist Rick Morton has produced another gritty but inspiring work, My Year of Living Vulnerably.

The Boy in the Field

This ninth novel by the Scottish-born Margot Livesey was nominated by the New York Times as one of 2020’s 100 Notable Books.

Uniting urges ‘bold’ reform of drug laws

Emma Maiden of Uniting contends that “our current drug laws are harsh, punitive, judgemental, discriminatory, isolating, out-dated and, dare I say, un-Christian”. Ms Maiden is...

All Our Shimmering Skies

All Our Shimmering Skies, like Trent Dalton's first novel and runaway best seller Boy Swallows Universe, is often gritty, violent and harrowing – but his luminous prose makes it a compelling read.

A Pilgrimage to Eternity – from Canterbury to Rome in Search of a Faith

Timothy Egan’s book is part travelogue, part memoir, part meditation on the past and future of Christianity and part history of the Church in Europe.

Bluebird

Malcolm Knox is best known as a journalist, columnist and former literary editor for the Sydney Morning Herald, but he is also the author of several books, both fiction and non-fiction.

The Beauty in Breaking

The Beauty in Breaking is a beautifully written and thoughtful memoir. The author moves between her childhood and the daily dramas of her hospital work, interspersed with deep insights into pain, trauma, healing, forgiveness and love.

Where the Crawdads Sing

Grenville has used her imagination to fill in the details of how the historical figure, Elizabeth Macarthur, may have thought and acted in A Room Made of Leaves, her fourth in a series of colonial novels, beginning with A Secret River in 2005.

A Room Made of Leaves

Grenville has used her imagination to fill in the details of how the historical figure, Elizabeth Macarthur, may have thought and acted in A Room Made of Leaves, her fourth in a series of colonial novels, beginning with A Secret River in 2005.

The Gospel of the Eels

Author Patrik Svensson describes The Gospel of the Eels as a “strange and nerdy book”. He isn’t wrong; his book (subtitled “A father, a son and the world’s most enigmatic fish”) is part memoir and part natural history with musings on other topics (the birth of the modern environmental movement and the meaning of miracles, for example) skillfully interwoven.

Phosphorescence

While published well before Covid-19 reached Australia, this book – subtitled On awe, wonder and things that sustain you when the world goes dark, is a timely read for this global pandemic.

This is Happiness

This is Happiness intrigued me with its title. Was the title sarcastic, a gibe at the miseries of an impoverished rural Ireland? Or was I about to read a twee tale of a mythical, pastoral, romantic Ireland?

Priestdaddy

If Patricia Lockwood’s family had been normal, they still would have been highly unusual.

The Gap – a paramedic’s summer on the edge

The best and worst of humanity – and much of its strangeness – is on display in Sydney paramedic Benjamin Gilmour's page-turner memoir The Gap.

The Dutch House

A deep sense of loss permeates the first part of The Dutch House; the rest of the novel details how the ensuing grief shapes the lives of protagonist Danny, and his older sister Maeve.