Friday, September 24, 2021

CULTURE

CULTURE

A History of My Brief Body

Situated in the context of other seminal queer texts, these pieces are a “kind of memoir”, Belcourt writes, that “stretch well beyond the boundaries my personal life”.

‘The World’s Best Film’ at 15th Annual Sydney Underground Film Festival

The World’s Best Film Director: Joshua Belinfante 15th Annual Sydney Underground Film Festival September 9-26, 2021 Joshua Belinfante was studying to be a solicitor when he was told...

The Labyrinth

What sets The Labyrinth apart, though, is both the beauty and simplicity of Lohrey’s writing and the magnitude of the tragedy that has caused her narrator, Erica, to flee Sydney for a tiny coastal town.

How to draw – online tutorials

Due to Covid lockdown the SSH Cartoon Show opening has been postponed (date TBA), and the exhibition extended indefinitely.

Uplifting Sydney images snapped by young photographers

Zoe Morris’s photo “Grumpy Cat”, shot in South Eveleigh,...

Australian Theatre Live

Australian Theatre Live touts itself as “Australian story telling...

Flock: First Nations Stories Then and Now

Award-winning author Ellen van Neerven has gathered a bumper crop of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stories in Flock.

On the street and online this library helps the homeless

While Martin Place fell into an uncharacteristic quiet during...

Covid crisis highlights need for Arts and Creative Industries reform

Across the arts community the impact of Covid-19 is catastrophic. Venues have shut their doors with little or no notice and organisations have been forced to cancel their programs and activities. It's time the Federal Government stepped in with real support.

 ‘I hope the book will reach kids like me’

The Boy from the Mish is both a classic coming of age novel and an unusual book.

Outlines

Outlines is the inaugural season of video works displaying boundary-pushing artists and technologists who are reimagining the future of performance.

Fable fun on Planet Zoom!

Community-based theatre company Natalie Mitz Productions continues to create...

Local art groups support and inspire

Art is expressive, therapeutic, political and historical as shown...

Five things wild and wonderful

The Boy from the Mish is both a classic coming of age novel and an unusual book.

Sea Country

“My people are proud, strong people. We are the descendants of Mannelargenna of the Pairrrebeenne / Trawlwoolway clan,” Aunty Patsy Cameron writes to introduce her generous tale of the environment and traditions that have shaped her life and kin.

The Tale of the Whale

If you want to motivate your kids (aged 4 and up) to be eco activists – try The Tale of the Whale. It’s a clarion call to us all to think about our oceans and their creatures and to stop our seas being the garbage tips for our over-indulgent lifestyles.

The Boy from the Mish

The Boy from the Mish is both a classic coming of age novel and an unusual book.

Smuggled – an illegal history of journeys to Australia

Authors Ruth Balint and Julie Kalman are associate professors, at the University of New South Wales and Monash University respectively. They are also both the children of European refugees and have taught and researched extensively on migration issues.

Where the Heart Is

Author Irma Gold was inspired by a newspaper piece about an oil-drenched Magellanic penguin chick that washed up on an island outside Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and was rescued by an islander named Joao who named him Dindim.

Music and more in store

Whether you descend down a narrow, dimly lit and...

Buzz builds for cartoon show

Due to Covid lockdown the SSH Cartoon Show opening has been postponed (date TBA), and the exhibition extended indefinitely.

Navigating consent? Grab this new guide

Welcome to Consent is a new book by adolescent health experts Yumi Stynes and Dr Melissa Kang, and it is timely, given disclosures by Brittany Higgins and Grace Tame, the removal of the federal government’s “milkshake” ad, and the Women’s March 4 Justice on March 15.

Youth opera company for social justice

The Cooperative’s performances of Puccini’s Tosca at Pitt Street Uniting Church on June 17 and 19 drew large audiences.

Pride Month show depicts diversity

As part of Pride Month, Pride Sydney and TAP Gallery put on an art competition allowing artists from all backgrounds to display their works with a chance of winning a prize.

Wildlife photography exhibition captures beauty and fragility

If you’re looking for a day out that will inspire you and your family the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition on at the Australian National Maritime Museum is the perfect pick. Great for the school holidays – but go anytime, really. Highly recommended.

Casey Barnes brings his catchy country music to Paddo

Country music star Casey Barnes is set to play in Sydney for the first time in two years. His gig in Paddington is part of his east coast tour for his latest single “Come Turn Me On”, a playful party-starting song about missing home.

Growing Pains

The lush collage art this in picture book is a delight – adding whimsy and gentleness to a tender tale of empathy, kindness and care for the environment, and how to draw on the strengths of others to overcome your fears.

‘You are home, Dimitris’

NEWTOWN: More than 350 mesmerised audience members, swayed, clapped...

SandSong

SandSong: Stories from the Great Sandy Desert is Bangarra Dance Theatre’s first new full-length work for three years, and in keeping with their unique signature style it combines authentic storytelling, superb technique and a powerfully emotive performance.

Creativity at the centre of our neighbourhood

WATERLOO: On May 15 the Orchard Gallery at South...

Growing Up Disabled in Australia

On Sunday, May 2, Carly Findlay, editor of Growing Up Disabled in Australia, spoke to an attentive audience at the 2021 Sydney Writers’ Festival (SWF). Our reviewer, Melinda Kearns, offers insights here about the session and the book.

The Cherry Orchard

The uppermost theme of Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard is not merely large-scale change but how to adjust to a change that is already in the process of taking place. Consequently Eamon Flack’s up-dated, thought-provoking and up-beat adaptation and staging of Chekhov’s much-loved play has much of importance to offer to our present, uncertain times.

Announcing the Blak & Blu prize

The Orchard Gallery is excited to announce its first art prize – the Blak & Blu prize – with $1,000 on offer to the winning artist.

Kate Wadey Trio brings silky sounds to Zetland

ZETLAND: A couple of weeks ago, I got to...

My Year of Living Vulnerably

Two years after his widely acclaimed One Hundred Years of Dirt, journalist Rick Morton has produced another gritty but inspiring work, My Year of Living Vulnerably.

Intact

The declared mission of new company, Fuser Production, is “to stir the human spirit” and incite “awe, challenge and inspiration through original and compelling art” and Intact, its debut performance, is deeply engaging and awe-inspiring.

Tiny Universe

You could watch TV or Netflix, but if you really wanted a completely absorbing and dynamic 60 minutes of entertainment you could see Tiny Universe, co-presented by Milk Crate Theatre and Shopfront Art Co-Op. Showing for a very short season, Tiny Universe deserves a longer season and a more extensive audience.

‘Stop killing the canary in the coalmine’ – Q&A with artist Bettina Kaiser

Sydney-based artist Bettina Kaiser’s Natura Morta exhibition challenges viewers to recognise the climate crisis and to act on it in several ways, including collecting rubbish off their local streets in return for one of her artworks.

Writers within reach

DARLINGTON: More than 400 Australian-based speakers and 15 international...

A Passage to India

Bringing Martin Sherman’s adaptation of E.M. Forster’s rich and sprawling novel A Passage to India to the compact stage of the Genesian would have posed many challenges. Apart from a large number of characters and costumes, a diversity of locations, the narrative is in no haste to reach its haunting conclusion.

Ulster American

David Ireland’s award-winning satire Ulster American takes as its target the current Western concern with constructing inclusive and equal cultural identities.

Dead Nature: a reckoning in the face of the climate crisis

CAMPERDOWN: Natura Morta, an exhibition of drawings, mixed media...

Dogged

Dogged offers theatregoers a unique and startling theatre experience. Unflinchingly facing the problematic relationship between black and white people in Australia, it is a brilliantly conceived, powerfully realised and deeply confronting parable.

The Courier

The Courier is “based on a true story”. Benedict Cumberbatch’s Greville Wynne really was a businessman recruited by MI6 during the Cold War to undertake Soviet Union intelligence gathering activities.

New mural celebrates local connections

DARLINGTON: Annandale-based artist Sharon Billinge has been collaborating with...

Hitting the HiWay for some hops and Holy Soul

ENMORE: The Holy Soul, like most bands, haven’t played...

The Boy in the Field

This ninth novel by the Scottish-born Margot Livesey was nominated by the New York Times as one of 2020’s 100 Notable Books.

Women changing male-dominated music production industry

It’s a rarity to see a woman working in...

Local burlesque icon marks a milestone

Long-time Redfern resident and celebrated burlesque dancer Mia Mortal...

‘Sunday afternoon’

Sunday afternoon ...

Klara and the Sun

In many of Ishiguro’s novels, his protagonists are not quite telling us the truth, or are perhaps, telling us only their perspective on what occurs around them.

Lofty lifts off – an interview with Helen Milroy

Western Australian of the Year, Dr Helen Milroy, has written and illustrated The Emu Who Ran Through the Sky, released in April, an exciting story for 5-10 year-olds about working together and finding the courage to be different.