Tuesday, October 5, 2021
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Little scribes write to bridge the city-country divide

Children in the city are being invited to swap their life stories with children in the country under pressure from the drought as part of the My Life Story program offered by children’s charity Royal Far West in partnership with the educational writing platform Littlescribe.

My Life Story supports children to write and illustrate their very own book. It aims to promote a positive self-image for all children, give them a voice, and cultivate understanding between primary school students living in NSW regional and remote areas with those living in Sydney.

Royal Far West CEO Lindsay Cane AM says, “Through our work we know that families in country areas are doing it really tough. This program gives them the vehicle to demonstrate they are proud of who they are and where they are from. Sharing their story and creating a book is a proud moment for them to be able to share with their family and friends as well as their city cousins.”

Last year’s pilot program involved 100 Year 5 and 6 children from Manly Village Public School as well as Brewarrina Central School, Bourke Public School and St Joseph’s Primary School in Walgett. This year, My Life Story aims to connect with 10,000 kids.

An important component is the fundraising support that participating city schools and kids engage in to raise $15 per book for the country kids, many of whom are in drought-affected regions and cannot raise the funds themselves.

Last year, one boy from Manly Village Public School raised $30 by selling jars of honey he harvested with his dad, and two girls raised $174 through cake sales at Manly beach.

Schools in the Sydney metropolitan region wishing to participate and show their support towards country kids and communities can register their interest via www.littlescribe.com/my-life-story/ now.

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